International Woodfuel Conference 2021

People are standing by a big truck loaded with what seems to be bags of coal.
(Photo: Christian Pilegaard Hansen)

Sustainable Woodfuel Value Chains in Africa: Governance, Social, Economic and Ecological Dimensions

23-25 NOVEMBER 2021, KUMASI, GHANA

Read full programme


Woodfuel (charcoal and firewood) constitutes over 70% of the energy needs for cooking and heating in sub-Saharan Africa. The consumption is on the rise due to population growth, poverty and urbanisation. The production is accessible to a large number of households, yet characterised by poor harvesting and processing practices.

The wood fuel sectors in most sub-Saharan African countries are characterised by a high degree of informality. There are on-going efforts in most countries to formalise the sector, that is, to organise, regulate and control the production and trade, typically under the heading of sustainability. These plans give stronger roles to institutions of the state to control the production and trade through permits, taxes, and enhanced controls. However, attempts at formalising the sector without an intimate understanding of the ecological, social, and economic contexts within which the production and trade take place, run the risk of failure or may compromise wood fuel-dependent livelihoods. Sustainable wood fuel production and trade remains a contested issue and big challenge in Africa that needs to be tackled urgently and collectively with all stakeholders involved.

At its 22nd session held in March 2020 in South Africa, the African Forestry and Wildlife Commission (AFWC) requested FAO to support the compilation, analysis and dissemination of good practices for sustainable charcoal production as well as the adoption of alternative sources of energy and recommended that FAO support countries in the formulation and implementation of national charcoal strategies. Indeed a number of organisations have been working in the sector with the aim of generating knowledge and evidence to support decision making for sustainable wood fuel production and consumption. This conference will provide an opportunity to discuss current knowledge, practices and experiences and best ways forward.

Find general information and travel guidelines below.

For any questions, kindly contact us via email.

Full programme

 

Arrival of participants

 

 

8:00-9:30

 

Conference check-in and morning coffee: Pick up badge and conference packet. Sale of tickets for the field trip on Day 3.

SESSION 1 - PLENARY

 

9:30-10:45

 

Plenary hall

 

CONFERENCE OPENING

Introduction of Chairperson

 Response by Chairperson

 

Welcome Address by Prof. Ben Kwaku Branoh Banful,

Provost, College of Agric. And Natural Resources, KNUST

 

Opening statement by Christian Pilegaard Hansen, University of Copenhagen on behalf of conference co-organizers

Statement by Mr. Abebe Haile-Gabriel, FAO Assistant Director General and Regional Representative for Africa

Statement by Mr. J.M Allotey, Chief Executive Officer, Forestry Commission Ghana

Statement by Hon. Matthew Opoku Prempeh, Minister of Energy, Ghana (tbc)

Chairperson’s closing remarks

Cultural interlude

 

Chairperson: Prof. (Mrs.) Rita Akosua Dickson (Vice Chancellor, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology)

 Moderator: Emmanuel Acheampong

10:45-11:00

 

Short break

11:00-12:00

Plenary hall

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION NO. 1

 

“The current state and future of charcoal research in Africa”, by Dr. Tuyeni Heita Mwampamba (online), National Autonomous University of Mexico

 

Questions and Answers

 

Moderator: Emmanuel Acheampong

12:00-13:30

 

LUNCH

SESSION 2 – PARALLEL TRACKS

13.30-15.00

Room 1

TRACK A – ACADEMIC

 

CHARCOAL ECONOMIC VALUE AND LIVELIHOODS

·       Factors influencing participation and income from charcoal production and trade in Ghana (Lawrence Kwabena Brobbey (physical))

·       Assessment of economic returns from charcoal production and trade in Oyo North Zone of Oyo State, Nigeria (Oyinlola Abiodun Fasoro (online))

·       Contribution of firewood harvesting and trading to the livelihood of rural households in the North East Gonja district in the Savannah Region of Ghana (Mohammed Seidu (physical))

·       Market analysis of fuelwood as household cooking energy in rural Rwanda – a qualitative assessment (S. Ramlah Abbas (physical))

·       An estimation of national charcoal production: The case of Ghana (KS Nketiah (physical))

 

Moderator: Mawa Karambiri

 

13.30-15.00

Room 2

TRACK B – ACADEMIC

SUSTAINABLE PLANTING AND REGENERATION OF WOODFUEL  

·       Tree plantations and the access of smallholder farmers to land and natural resources in the transition zone of Ghana (Kojo Amanor (Physical)

·       Perception of charcoal producers on the establishment of woodlots for charcoal production and its impacts on their livelihoods: a case study in the Kintampo North Municipality of the Bono East Region of Ghana (Adade Michael (physical))

·       World Vision Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) Approach- A Catalyst for Sustainable Wood fuel production in Ghana (Maxwell Amedi (online))

·       Short rotation Acacia decurrens woodlot sustainable fuel wood production and financial feasibly of in Fagta Lekoma district of Northwestern Amhara, Ethiopia (Takele Ferede (online))

·       Using pruning from trees on-farms and cleaner biomass cooking appliances reduces women’s energy burden and improves human wellbeing (James K Gitau (physical))

 

Moderator: Frank Agyei

13.30-15.00

Plenary hall

TRACK C – PRACTICE 

 

SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES 

·       Managing invasive Prosopis species through charcoal production in Kenya (Simon Choge, Kenya Forestry Research Institute (online))

·       Raising awareness campaign for youth on land restoration through nursery development and tree planting; Damian James, MVIWAARUSHA/FFF (online)

·       Practice alternatives: Combination of sustainably farmer-managed natural regeneration within community landscapes for charcoal production; Mark Kebo Akparibo, GHaFFaP (physical)

·       Green Fire Belts for firewood and charcoal production, Lucy Amissah (physical), CSIR- Forestry Research Institute of Ghana, Kumasi, Ghana

·       Transitioning Wood Fuel Energy as Catalyst for Landscape Restoration and Sustainability Daryl Bosu(physical) /A Rocha Ghana, Cisco Aust (physical)/GIZ Ghana

 

Moderator:   Sophie Grouwels, FAO/FFF 

15:00 -15:30

 

Coffee and tea break

SESSION 3 – PARALLEL TRACKS

15:30-17:00

Room 1

TRACK A – ACADEMIC

 

CHARCOAL GOVERNANCE

·       Blaming informality to hide the failure of energy policies: the politics of woodfuel in Cameroon (Herman Wandji (physical))

·       Institutional and governance arrangements shaping cross-border charcoal trade flows, a case study of Busia Border Post, Kenya-Uganda Border (Jared Gambo (physical))

·       Community-Based Governance Arrangements for Charcoal Production in Ghana (Joseph Asante (physical))

·       Effects of transition from open access to community-based management on the social network of charcoal producers (Hanneke van ‘t Veen (online))

·       Towards Formalization of Woodfuel Value Chain in Liberia: Progress and Challenges (Dr. Ibrahim M. Favada (online))

·       Preparation and implementation of a fuelwood supply masterplan in Cameroon (ProPFE/GIZ) and Madagascar (PAGE/GIZ) (Martial Charpin (online))

 

Moderator: Kyereh Boateng

15:30-17:00

Room 2

TRACK B – ACADEMIC

 

CLIMATE CHANGE AND WOODFUEL

·       Climate change impacts and decarbonization of woodfuel (charcoal and firewood) systems in Kenya (Moses Kirimi (physical))

·       Climate Reparations: A new continental policy strategy to reforest the sub-Sahara (Phil Wilmot (physical))

·       Mesures d’atténuation de l’abattage du bois dans le Bassin du Congo: l’expérience du projet pilote REDD+ au nord-Cameroun (Mebe Mba’a Cédrick Serges Maël (physical))

·       REDD+ and the issue of inequalities in the governance of Woodfuel in Central Africa (Sandrine Andong (physical))

·       Profile of Improved Cooking Technologies amongst Charcoal Dependent Urban Households in Zambia (Elisha Ncube (online))

Moderator: Joana Beulah Echeruo

15:30-17:00

Plenary hall

TRACK C – PRACTICE

KILN/STOVES TECHNOLOGIES

·       Video: Prosopis charcoal production using improved earth mound kiln in Baringo County, Kenya. Joseph Kibet

·       Technical and environmental performance of the Green Mad Retort charcoal-making kiln in Madagascar, Michaël Temmerman, ECO Consult Germany (online)

·       Sustainable production of charcoal and manufacture of bio fertilizer based on the casamance kiln, Togo (Noumonvi Kodjo,  UROPC-M (online))

·       Charcoal Production with efficient kilns – work experience Dr. Chris Adam (physical), Kiln producer

·       Video: Charcoal Production in Zambia Jolien Shure, CIFOR (physical) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9wekg4aiNQ&t=1s

 

 Moderator: K.S. Nketiah

17:00-17:15

 

Short break

SESSION 4 – PLENARY

17:15-18.45

Plenary hall

Policy panel: Dialogue on effective woodfuel management in multifunctional landscapes (organized by ICRAF/CIFOR)

Presentation: Options for sustainable woodfuel as part of wider forest-agricultural landscapes. Jolien Schure, CIFOR Associate.

 

Panelists:

1.       Zambia: New charcoal rules and option for integrating Assisted Natural Regeneration in policy. Deuteronomy Kasaro (online), Principal Forestry Officer.

2.       Kenya: Charcoal Rules, 10 years on. Clement Ng’oriarengm (physical), Kenya Forest Service.

3.       Cameroon: Incentive mechanism for charcoal from wood residues. Georges Amougou, MINFOF Littoral.

4.       Ghana: Bridging the sectoral divide. Kwakye Ameyaw (Physical), Ghana Forestry Commission.

 

Launch of new CIFOR-ICRAF Brief Series on Sustainable Woodfuel.

 

Moderator: Phosiso Sola

18:45-

 

Reception with food and drinks

Exhibition, posters and documentaries

 

 

SESSION 5 – PLENARY

09:00-09:30

Plenary hall

Reporting and take away messages from Day 1

 

Reports from moderators

 

Moderator: Mercy Owusu Ansah 

 

Join session online:

https://ucph-ku.zoom.us/j/61444934679

 

SESSION 6 – PARALLEL TRACKS

09:30-11:00

Room 1

TRACK A – ACADEMIC

 

CHARCOAL LANDSCAPES

·         The long term role of the charcoal industry in landscape and livelihood change: multidisciplinary evidence from Mozambique (Casey Ryan (online))

·         Charcoal production site detection using a combined remote sensing approach with Landsat-8, Sentinel-2 and VHR satellite imagery (Hanneke van ‘t Veen (online))

·         Applying Landscape approach to charcoal value Chains: The GML Project Model in Yangambi Engagement Landscape (YEL), Republic Democratic of Congo (Lwanga Kasereka-Muvatsi (Physical))

·         Sustainable charcoal production in community-based forest management areas in Tanzania (Charles Leonard (Physical))

·         Wood fuel production systems in the refugee settlement of Garoua boulai council – East Cameroon (Pamela Tabi (Online))

·         Fuelwood Rush and the Assemblage of Community Forest Management in Burkina Faso (Mawa Karambiri (Physical))

 

Moderator: Jolien Schure

09:30-11:00

Room 2

TRACK B – ACADEMIC

 

WOODFUELS AND ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT

·         The prevalence of shea charcoal in markets in northern Ghana: a threat to the shea parklands. (Thomas Addoah (online))

·         Sources of wood for charcoal production in Asantekwa and Nkwanta (Tontie L Kanton (physical))

·         The importance of versatility in the selection of priority species by local communities for wood energy plantation (Ifèdé-Olla Aurès Parfait Tchiché (online))

·         Sustainable biomass production for enhanced energy and food security – exploring the potential of improved fallows (Natxo García-López (physical))

·         How land tenure and labor relations mediate charcoal’s environmental footprint in Zambia: implications for sustainable energy transitions (Johanne Pelletier (online))

 

Moderator: Christian P Hansen

09:30-11:00

Plenary hall

TRACK C – PRACTICE 

SUSTAINABLE BIO ENERGY ALTERNATIVES

·         Cotton stalks for briquettes in Zambia (John Ngwenya, Cotton Association of Zambia (Online))

·         Charcoal production from sawmill residues in the East Cameroon region Félix Kouedji (physical), Eco Consult Germany

·         Use of Bamboo for Energy Production Michael Kwaku (physical), Ghana and National Coordinator, Inter-Africa Bamboo Smallholder Farmers Livelihood Development Programme (INBAR) Kumasi-Ghana

·         Biochar to restore cocoa forest in Ghana. Ellen R. Graber (Physical), Volcani Institute

·         Video on sustainable wood energy and forest landscape restoration Michela Morese (online), Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP), FAO

 

Moderator: Enoch Agyepong, Renewable Energy Association of Ghana

11:00-11:30

 

Coffee and tea break

11:30-12:30

Plenary hall

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION NO. 2

 

“Charcoal as just another arena of exploitation: Precarity is everywhere” by Prof. Jesse Ribot (online)  (American University, Washington DC)

 

Questions and Answers

 

Moderator: Frank Agyei

12:30-14:00

 

Lunch

SESSION 7 – PARALLEL TRACKS

14:00-15:30

Room 1

TRACK A: Policy panel: How conducive are energy and environmental policies in Africa to sustainability interventions in the charcoal sector? Preliminary findings from an assessment of 31 AFR100 countries (organized by FAO and AUDA-NEPAD)

 

·         Overview of main findings by Tuyeni Mwampamba and co- authors

·         Q & A and feedback on main findings from audience

·         Presentation and discussion of country-specific findings in breakout groups

 

Moderator: Tuyeni Mwampamba

14:00-15:30

Room 2

TRACK B - ACADEMIC

 

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

·         The impacts of Covid-19 on the charcoal value chain and rural livelihoods in Mozambique (Judith Krauss (online))

·         Aiding or Ruining? Voluntary Schemes and Women’s Role along Ghana’s Charcoal Commodity Chain (Joseph Asante (physical))

·          “Forestry officials don’t have any land or rights here”: Authority of politico-legal institutions along Ghana’s charcoal commodity chain (Frank Agyei (physical))

·         The charcoal value chain in Kenya: Actors, practices and trade flows in selected sites (Geoffrey Ndegwa (online)

·         Charcoal Value Chain Analysis in Mt. Kulal Biosphere and Mukogodo Landscapes in Northern Kenya (Emily Kitheka (online))

 

Moderator: Emmanuel Acheampong

 

14:00-15:30

Plenary hall

TRACK C - PRACTICE

 

INSTITUTIONAL MECHANISMS

·         Organization of local charcoal chapters and local governance in Liberia (Richard T.A. Dorbor, National Charcoal Union of Liberia (online))

·         The Participatory Guarantee System for sustainable charcoal – Pilot in  Choma District, Zambia (Francis Biemba, ZNFCA-Choma (online))

·         Firewood producers and marketing association empowers women through branch firewood commercialization, Gambia (Kanimang Camara and Jainaba Badjie, Firewood Producers and Marketing Association (online))

·         Video; Charcoal makers turn to sustainability in Yangambi Landscape, DRC CIFOR  Jolien Schure  https://www.cifor.org/knowledge/video/u3UMxH3XgGg

 

Moderator: Paul Osei Tutu

15:30-16:00

 

Coffee and tea break

SESSION 8 - PLENARY

16:00-17:30

 

Plenary hall

MULTI-STAKEHOLDER PANEL – WHAT FUTURE FOR WOODFUELS IN AFRICA? REFLECTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS TO MOVE FORWARD

 

Panelists:

·         Rashid Ali Abdallah, Executive Director, African Energy Commission

·         Xia Zuzhang, Forestry officer, FAO Forestry Division

·         Mamadou Diakhite, AFR100 Coordinator,  AUDA-NEPAD

·         Seth Mahu, Ministry of Energy,  Ghana

·         Anicef Ngomin, Ministry of Forestry, Cameroon

·         Béatrice Despioch, Co-founder Eco-charcoal Limited, Kenya

·         Mark K. Akparibo,  Ghana Federation of Forest and Farm Producers

 

Questions and answers session

 

Moderator: Nora Berrahmouni

17:30-18:00

Plenary hall

WRAP-UP, NEXT STEPS AND CLOSING 

 

Closing statements:

·         Robert Nasi, Director General CIFOR and Managing Director CIFOR-ICRAF

·         Abebe Haile-Gabriel, FAO Assistant Director General and Regional Representative for Africa

·         Government of Ghana (name to be confirmed)

 

Moderator: Christian P. Hansen

 

Time Event
8:00-19:00
FIELD TRIP

Sustainable woodfuel production in Ghana (optional)

 

Moderators: Lawrence Brobbey/Joseph Asante

 

 

About the conference

 

 

 

 

The conference will be held at the campus of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in the city of Kumasi in the Ashanti region of Ghana. Kumasi is easily reached by public transportation from Accra, the capital of Ghana.

The conference is hybrid, allowing participation with physical or virtual (on-line) presence. If a hybrid conference is not possible due to continued COVID-19 restrictions, the conference will convert to full virtual conference.

NB! Online participants via Zoom should keep cameras and microphones off at all time.

The conference will have two days of presentations and discussions divided into academic, policy and practice sessions. The third day (25 November) is a field trip. See the tentative programme of the conference above.

Simultaneous interpretation between English and French will be available.

 

 

Covid-19 Protocols and Travel Guidelines

Covid-19 safety protocols including wearing of nose mask, hand washing, physical distancing shall
be strictly adhered to at the conference. Basic safety items including nose masks, hand sanitizers,
handheld thermometers (for body temperature) will be made available at the conference.
Participants are encouraged to always observe the protocols within and outside the conference
premises.
International participants are note that Ghana, like all countries has in place its own rules and
guidelines for entry and exit. For now, the Kotoka International Airport remains open to all flights.
All land borders are however closed.

Ghana Civil Aviation Authority is a useful website for guidance on international travels. It is also possible to download a pdf pamphlet released by the Ghana Ministry of Health for guidelines for international flight operations
on COVID-19 safety at the Kotoka International Airport.

Please note that given the dynamic nature of the pandemic, the protocols at the airport are subject
to change with time.

Visa Requirements

International participants may please see https://home.gis.gov.gh/permits-and-visas/ for visa
categories, requirements and processes.

Conference Venue

The conference will take place at:
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Business School
Auditorium in the city of Kumasi, and ON-LINE.

GoogleMaps location here.

Once at the main entrance to the University (KNUST), follow directional arrows to the conference
venue. The route takes you to a 2nd roundabout and straight on to a 3rd roundabout. The Paa Joe
Sports Stadium is on the left. At the 3rd roundabout, take a left turn to the traffic light; from there,
take right and go straight down a valley, leaving the College of Engineering on the left. As you
begin to ascend again, the School of Graduate Studies is on the right and the conference venue is
next to the School, on the same side of the road.
The Conference Venue is a round building in cream and orange colours with a large frontal car park
and patches of green grass.

More information about the Host City – Kumasi

Kumasi is the main city of Ashanti Region located at the center, and connecting all parts of Ghana.
The city is considered the home of the Ashanti people with their current King being Otumfuo Osei
Tutu II. Kumasi is widely regarded as the cultural cradle of Ghana as the vibrancy of Ghana's culture
is more evident here than any part of the country. The traditional Asante buildings in the region
are on the UNESCO World Heritage list. Visit WikiVoyage for further information on Kumasi, and interesting facts.

Accommodation

Kumasi offers a range of hotels and guest houses. Those in close proximity to the conference
venue i.e. KNUST Business School are listed below, with their rates, relative distances from the
Centre and contacts for reservations/bookings.

Hotel/Guest House Rate, in US
Dollars
Distance to
Conference Centre
Anita Hotel 55-80 8km
NODA Hotel 55-80 5km
Kings Tower Hotel 40-120 4km
Silicon Hotel 55-70 1km
Asantewaa Premier Guest House 33-60 5km
Golden Tulip Hotel 80-150 11km
Golden Bean Hotel 70-150 10.5km

Hotels, and Guest Houses (Booking/Reservation Contacts):


Transportation

From Kotoka International Airport, Accra, there are two main options to Kumasi (conference
venue), by air and by road.

By Air
There are a number of direct flights each day from Kotoka International Airport to Kumasi Airport
by two main Airlines: Africa World and Passion Air. The average travel time is 35 minutes. Prices
range between US$ 65 and US$ 100 (GHs 400 to 600), depending on airline, time of booking and
time of travel. Tickets and travel times are available at Fly Africa World and Fly Passion Air.

By Road
Travel by road could be via rented vehicle (a car or 4x4 station wagon) or by bus. Rented vehicles
are available at the airport for between US$ 200 and 250 all-inclusive.
The State Transport Company and Public travel companies have their Bus Terminals within Accra
city and are accessible via Taxi, Uber or Bolt; fares range from the equivalent of US$ 20 – 50.
Buses travel directly from Accra to Kumasi (KNUST Junction) usually with one health stop at a
designated spot. The average travel time is 4 – 5 hours. Prices range between ȼ45 – 65 (US$ 8 – 12).
Bus tickets can be purchased directly at the Terminal or from the following websites:
Intercity STC Busses
2m Express
VIP Transport Services and OA Travel & Tours

Transportation to the Conference Venue, and Movement within Kumasi
Movement within the city of Kumasi is safe, easy and simple by using the services of registered
travel companies such as Uber and Bolt. Participants are advised to download apps for accessing
services of the internal transport operators. It takes less than 10 minutes from KNUST Bus stop to
the Conference venue. From the Kumasi Airport to the Conference venue take less than 30 minutes
depending on traffic situation.

For Android and IOS users, we recommend downloading the UBER app and/or Bolt app.

Participants are advised to make use of these transport services while in Kumasi for comfort and
safety. Once on board, no other passengers can join you. Please note that, individual or private
taxis not registered with these internal transport operators are restricted from entering central
sections of KNUST including the conference area. Prices depend on distance and time of travel but
generally starts from ȼ 10 (c.a. US$1.50)

Currency

The Ghana Cedi (ȼ) is the currency in Ghana, and other currencies are not accepted. Most shops
and restaurants have Point of Sale Devices (POS) and accept foreign credit cards (but may charge
a fee), but smaller shops, restaurants and cafes may not. It is therefore advisable to carry some
cash in Ghana Cedi. You can withdraw cash from ATM machines all around KNUST Commercial Area
or the central business districts of the city. Banks are open from 8:30 am to 4 pm on weekdays.
There are several Forex Bureaux at the airport and in the city centre with longer opening hours.
NB: all quotations/rates/service charges etc. in the document is based on Ghana cedi/Dollar
exchange rate as at 10th September 2021. For most up to date exchange rates, please check Bank of Ghana and OANDA.

Tourism

Information on tourist sights and attractions can be found at the Visit Ghana website. 

Weather

Average temperature for Kumasi in November is will be between 23°C – 33°C. November is the end
of the minor rainy season and may still experience some showers; you may bring an umbrella or
rain jacket with you. Local weather forecasts can be found at AccuWeather.

Shops

Shops open from 9:00 am to 6 pm on Mondays to Saturdays; supermarkets/shopping malls often
go from 9 am to 10 pm. On Sundays most shops are closed.

Restaurants and cafes

For food and drinks you might find inspiration from this Google Map containing all above mentioned hotels, venues, transport, and bike rental locations.
Please note that, on the days of the conference, coffee/tea, snacks and lunch will be provided.
For information and access to relevent services including, location and payments, please visit the Government of Ghana website.

 

 

Due to high interest and number of already registered participants, we have closed the registration for the conference.

There is a limited number of additional slots available for online participation. If interested, please send an email with your name, email address and institution to lca@ifro.ku.dk.