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A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity

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A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity. / Lund, Thomas Bøker; Brodersen, John; Sandøe, Peter.

In: Obesity Facts, Vol. 11, No. 6, 2018, p. 501-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Lund, TB, Brodersen, J & Sandøe, P 2018, 'A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity', Obesity Facts, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 501-513. https://doi.org/10.1159/000493373

APA

Lund, T. B., Brodersen, J., & Sandøe, P. (2018). A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity. Obesity Facts, 11(6), 501-513. https://doi.org/10.1159/000493373

Vancouver

Lund TB, Brodersen J, Sandøe P. A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity. Obesity Facts. 2018;11(6):501-513. https://doi.org/10.1159/000493373

Author

Lund, Thomas Bøker ; Brodersen, John ; Sandøe, Peter. / A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity. In: Obesity Facts. 2018 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 501-513.

Bibtex

@article{5838ee45a01341e88905eb7212a01692,
title = "A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity",
abstract = "Objectives: The study investigated whether treatment options for episodic tension-type headache vary among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark depending on the patients’ weight status and gender, and whether these decisions can be explained by the GPs’ own anti-fat bias and lifestyle. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study with responses from 240 GPs on measures of anti-fat bias, healthiness of GPs’ lifestyles, and reported patient treatment decisions. Results: GPs tended to exhibit negative explicit and implicit anti-fat bias. There were no differences in choice of medical treatment for patients with obesity and those of a normal weight. GPs were more likely to advise a general health check to a patient with obesity (p < 0.001). GPs treating a male patient with obesity were less likely to believe that their patient would comply with the advised treatment compared to those with a male patient of normal weight. Compared with other patient types (4.4–7.7{\%}), GPs who treated a male patient with obesity (27.9{\%}) were more likely to advise a general health check only and no diary-keeping or follow-up consultation (p < 0.001). This was explained by the healthiness of the GPs’ lifestyles (Spearman’s ρ = 0.367; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the presence of clear anti-fat bias, there were no differences in medical treatment, and GPs managed the general health of patients with obesity proactively. The fact that the GPs’ own lifestyle influenced the likelihood that they would recommend diary-keeping and follow-up consultations for male patients with obesity is remarkable and requires further investigation.",
keywords = "Clinical vignette, Obesity management, Primary care, Weight bias",
author = "Lund, {Thomas B{\o}ker} and John Brodersen and Peter Sand{\o}e",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1159/000493373",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "501--513",
journal = "Obesity Facts",
issn = "1662-4025",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A study of anti-fat bias among Danish general practitioners and whether this bias and general practitioners' lifestyle can affect treatment of tension headache in patients with obesity

AU - Lund, Thomas Bøker

AU - Brodersen, John

AU - Sandøe, Peter

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Objectives: The study investigated whether treatment options for episodic tension-type headache vary among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark depending on the patients’ weight status and gender, and whether these decisions can be explained by the GPs’ own anti-fat bias and lifestyle. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study with responses from 240 GPs on measures of anti-fat bias, healthiness of GPs’ lifestyles, and reported patient treatment decisions. Results: GPs tended to exhibit negative explicit and implicit anti-fat bias. There were no differences in choice of medical treatment for patients with obesity and those of a normal weight. GPs were more likely to advise a general health check to a patient with obesity (p < 0.001). GPs treating a male patient with obesity were less likely to believe that their patient would comply with the advised treatment compared to those with a male patient of normal weight. Compared with other patient types (4.4–7.7%), GPs who treated a male patient with obesity (27.9%) were more likely to advise a general health check only and no diary-keeping or follow-up consultation (p < 0.001). This was explained by the healthiness of the GPs’ lifestyles (Spearman’s ρ = 0.367; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the presence of clear anti-fat bias, there were no differences in medical treatment, and GPs managed the general health of patients with obesity proactively. The fact that the GPs’ own lifestyle influenced the likelihood that they would recommend diary-keeping and follow-up consultations for male patients with obesity is remarkable and requires further investigation.

AB - Objectives: The study investigated whether treatment options for episodic tension-type headache vary among general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark depending on the patients’ weight status and gender, and whether these decisions can be explained by the GPs’ own anti-fat bias and lifestyle. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study with responses from 240 GPs on measures of anti-fat bias, healthiness of GPs’ lifestyles, and reported patient treatment decisions. Results: GPs tended to exhibit negative explicit and implicit anti-fat bias. There were no differences in choice of medical treatment for patients with obesity and those of a normal weight. GPs were more likely to advise a general health check to a patient with obesity (p < 0.001). GPs treating a male patient with obesity were less likely to believe that their patient would comply with the advised treatment compared to those with a male patient of normal weight. Compared with other patient types (4.4–7.7%), GPs who treated a male patient with obesity (27.9%) were more likely to advise a general health check only and no diary-keeping or follow-up consultation (p < 0.001). This was explained by the healthiness of the GPs’ lifestyles (Spearman’s ρ = 0.367; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the presence of clear anti-fat bias, there were no differences in medical treatment, and GPs managed the general health of patients with obesity proactively. The fact that the GPs’ own lifestyle influenced the likelihood that they would recommend diary-keeping and follow-up consultations for male patients with obesity is remarkable and requires further investigation.

KW - Clinical vignette

KW - Obesity management

KW - Primary care

KW - Weight bias

U2 - 10.1159/000493373

DO - 10.1159/000493373

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

SP - 501

EP - 513

JO - Obesity Facts

T2 - Obesity Facts

JF - Obesity Facts

SN - 1662-4025

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 212246760