"The scarlet letters": Information disclosure and self-regulation: Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

"The scarlet letters": Information disclosure and self-regulation : Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark. / Belay, Dagim; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård.

In: Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Vol. 104, 102385, 2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Belay, D & Jensen, JD 2020, '"The scarlet letters": Information disclosure and self-regulation: Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark', Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, vol. 104, 102385. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeem.2020.102385

APA

Belay, D., & Jensen, J. D. (2020). "The scarlet letters": Information disclosure and self-regulation: Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 104, [102385]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeem.2020.102385

Vancouver

Belay D, Jensen JD. "The scarlet letters": Information disclosure and self-regulation: Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. 2020;104. 102385. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeem.2020.102385

Author

Belay, Dagim ; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård. / "The scarlet letters": Information disclosure and self-regulation : Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark. In: Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. 2020 ; Vol. 104.

Bibtex

@article{4885af7c5ec0435c9f87c0ec084dd96e,
title = "{"}The scarlet letters{"}: Information disclosure and self-regulation: Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark",
abstract = "This article presents the first empirical estimates regarding the impact of information disclosure on farmers’ economic behavior in terms of antibiotic use. We used the Danish government’s public release of information regarding antibiotic use among pig farms in summer 2010 as a quasi-experiment to exploit the variation in the intensity of damage to farmers’ reputation. The study finds that the information disclosure has induced a significant (20–30{\%}) reduction in pig farmer’s subsequent antibiotic use, with the largest reductions for farms specialized in finisher pig production, both when evaluating the volume of active compounds and the number of prescribed doses. The results also show that the public disclosure has no effect on the survival of farmers in the market, however; it has induced input substitution in terms of increased purchase of vaccines.",
author = "Dagim Belay and Jensen, {J{\o}rgen Dejg{\aa}rd}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1016/j.jeem.2020.102385",
language = "English",
volume = "104",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Economics and Management",
issn = "0095-0696",
publisher = "Academic Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - "The scarlet letters": Information disclosure and self-regulation

T2 - Evidence from antibiotic use in Denmark

AU - Belay, Dagim

AU - Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - This article presents the first empirical estimates regarding the impact of information disclosure on farmers’ economic behavior in terms of antibiotic use. We used the Danish government’s public release of information regarding antibiotic use among pig farms in summer 2010 as a quasi-experiment to exploit the variation in the intensity of damage to farmers’ reputation. The study finds that the information disclosure has induced a significant (20–30%) reduction in pig farmer’s subsequent antibiotic use, with the largest reductions for farms specialized in finisher pig production, both when evaluating the volume of active compounds and the number of prescribed doses. The results also show that the public disclosure has no effect on the survival of farmers in the market, however; it has induced input substitution in terms of increased purchase of vaccines.

AB - This article presents the first empirical estimates regarding the impact of information disclosure on farmers’ economic behavior in terms of antibiotic use. We used the Danish government’s public release of information regarding antibiotic use among pig farms in summer 2010 as a quasi-experiment to exploit the variation in the intensity of damage to farmers’ reputation. The study finds that the information disclosure has induced a significant (20–30%) reduction in pig farmer’s subsequent antibiotic use, with the largest reductions for farms specialized in finisher pig production, both when evaluating the volume of active compounds and the number of prescribed doses. The results also show that the public disclosure has no effect on the survival of farmers in the market, however; it has induced input substitution in terms of increased purchase of vaccines.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jeem.2020.102385

DO - 10.1016/j.jeem.2020.102385

M3 - Journal article

VL - 104

JO - Journal of Environmental Economics and Management

JF - Journal of Environmental Economics and Management

SN - 0095-0696

M1 - 102385

ER -

ID: 249544546