Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

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Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications. / Finger, Robert; Grebitus, Carola; Henningsen, Arne.

In: EuroChoices, 04.11.2023.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Finger, R, Grebitus, C & Henningsen, A 2023, 'Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications', EuroChoices. https://doi.org/10.1111/1746-692X.12413

APA

Finger, R., Grebitus, C., & Henningsen, A. (2023). Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications. EuroChoices. https://doi.org/10.1111/1746-692X.12413

Vancouver

Finger R, Grebitus C, Henningsen A. Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications. EuroChoices. 2023 Nov 4. https://doi.org/10.1111/1746-692X.12413

Author

Finger, Robert ; Grebitus, Carola ; Henningsen, Arne. / Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications. In: EuroChoices. 2023.

Bibtex

@article{c30ab136057641388fdfa060f49cdb85,
title = "Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications",
abstract = "Currently, policy decisions are often made based on untested scientific results. Replication studies repeat previously published research and, thus, are an effective way to test the validity and reliability of research studies, as well as to test the potential for generalisations of such studies. Replications can contribute to improved policy decisions and thus more efficient use of resources. To date, very few replications of research in agricultural economics are available and the incentives to engage in replications are low. Moreover, the conditions for replicating studies are poor. For example, published articles often lack full transparency in terms of documentation, data and computer code. This Point de Vue highlights the advantages of striving for conditions that facilitate replication studies and foster such a culture in agricultural economics. Policymakers could explicitly invite and support replications of studies that are key for good policymaking. To this end, they can address both demand-side and supply-side problems of replications, for example, by inviting, valuing and supporting replications of policy-relevant analyses and by providing institutional and legal infrastructure facilitating open science and replications. With this, policy can support the agricultural economics profession, while agricultural economists can support sound policymaking, both reaping the benefits of a more transparent research culture.",
author = "Robert Finger and Carola Grebitus and Arne Henningsen",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2023 The Authors. EuroChoices published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Agricultural Economics Society and European Association of Agricultural Economists.",
year = "2023",
month = nov,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1111/1746-692X.12413",
language = "English",
journal = "EuroChoices",
issn = "1478-0917",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving agricultural policy decisions through replications

AU - Finger, Robert

AU - Grebitus, Carola

AU - Henningsen, Arne

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2023 The Authors. EuroChoices published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Agricultural Economics Society and European Association of Agricultural Economists.

PY - 2023/11/4

Y1 - 2023/11/4

N2 - Currently, policy decisions are often made based on untested scientific results. Replication studies repeat previously published research and, thus, are an effective way to test the validity and reliability of research studies, as well as to test the potential for generalisations of such studies. Replications can contribute to improved policy decisions and thus more efficient use of resources. To date, very few replications of research in agricultural economics are available and the incentives to engage in replications are low. Moreover, the conditions for replicating studies are poor. For example, published articles often lack full transparency in terms of documentation, data and computer code. This Point de Vue highlights the advantages of striving for conditions that facilitate replication studies and foster such a culture in agricultural economics. Policymakers could explicitly invite and support replications of studies that are key for good policymaking. To this end, they can address both demand-side and supply-side problems of replications, for example, by inviting, valuing and supporting replications of policy-relevant analyses and by providing institutional and legal infrastructure facilitating open science and replications. With this, policy can support the agricultural economics profession, while agricultural economists can support sound policymaking, both reaping the benefits of a more transparent research culture.

AB - Currently, policy decisions are often made based on untested scientific results. Replication studies repeat previously published research and, thus, are an effective way to test the validity and reliability of research studies, as well as to test the potential for generalisations of such studies. Replications can contribute to improved policy decisions and thus more efficient use of resources. To date, very few replications of research in agricultural economics are available and the incentives to engage in replications are low. Moreover, the conditions for replicating studies are poor. For example, published articles often lack full transparency in terms of documentation, data and computer code. This Point de Vue highlights the advantages of striving for conditions that facilitate replication studies and foster such a culture in agricultural economics. Policymakers could explicitly invite and support replications of studies that are key for good policymaking. To this end, they can address both demand-side and supply-side problems of replications, for example, by inviting, valuing and supporting replications of policy-relevant analyses and by providing institutional and legal infrastructure facilitating open science and replications. With this, policy can support the agricultural economics profession, while agricultural economists can support sound policymaking, both reaping the benefits of a more transparent research culture.

U2 - 10.1111/1746-692X.12413

DO - 10.1111/1746-692X.12413

M3 - Comment/debate

AN - SCOPUS:85175630807

JO - EuroChoices

JF - EuroChoices

SN - 1478-0917

ER -

ID: 372815997